Chemical Protective Clothing

Don’t risk leaving an inch of yourself exposed while working with chemicals. Get full-body coverage with protective clothing, suits, coveralls, and other chemical-resistant gear from Enviro. For fast protection against hazardous liquids and vapors, try an all-in-one coverall or jumpsuit tailored to fend off dangers with a couple quick zips and snaps. Or, build your chemical barrier from the ground up with compatible separates, from shoe covers to hoods. This selection of disposable apparel suits a range of work environments and meets various federal safety standards. Gear up for serious chemical protection with clothing that never quits from Enviro Safety Products.

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Why Workers Need Chemical Coveralls

The purpose of chemical coveralls is to shield individuals from the physical, chemical, and biological hazards they may encounter during work. Some chemicals offer no warnings and can pose invisible threats. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) created a chemical protective clothing manual on helping to determine four levels of chemical risk workers might be subject to.

  • Level A – This type of chemical coveralls provide the greatest level of skin protection available. This type of clothing must be vapor-tight, gas-tight, and splash-resistant. These garments need to be worn only when there is a potential threat to life and health. A self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) is required at this level.
  • Level B/C – These chemical coveralls will protect from chemical splash, but not exposure from vapors or gases. The coveralls may or may not be completely encapsulated, since a lower level of skin protection is required. Some chemicals may be known. A SCBA is also required at this level.
  • Level D – These varieties of chemical coveralls offer the lowest level of protection and are worn when no potential chemical hazard exists. These are normal work uniforms, offering minimal protection to minuscule exposure and can be disposable.

How To Choose The Right Chemical Coveralls

Choosing the right material and style for your chemical coveralls is also important to your safety. When deciding which material, consider the following qualities:

  • Breakthrough Time - The time it takes a chemical to pass through coveralls once exposure occurs.
  • Permeation Rate - The speed at which a chemical passes through coveralls once breakthrough has occurred.
  • Suit Design - Refers to how the suit is stitched together. Coverall material can be joined together by a stitch or weld. Stitches can create pin holes that could allow chemicals to penetrate. Welded seams involve welding tape over the stitched seam and offer a greater level of protection.


Seam Types

Serged Seams for dry protection

Serged Seam

A serged seam joins two pieces of material with a thread stitch that interlocks. This is an economical stitching method for general applications. Chemical protective clothing generally does not employ this stitching method. It is more commonly found on limited use clothing where dry particulates are of a concern.

 
Bound seams for liquid and dry protection

Sewn and Bound Seam

This seam joins two pieces of material with an overlay of similar material and is chain stitched through all of the layers for a clean, finished edge. This provides increased holdout of liquids and dry particulates.

 
sealed seams for level A and B protection

Heat Sealed Seam

A heat-sealed seam is sewn and then sealed with heat-activated tape. This method provides liquid-proof seams and is especially useful for Level A and B chemical protective clothing.
 
sealed seams for level A and B protection

Heat Sealed Plus Seam

This is the strongest seam offered. This seam is created by sewing and then heat-sealing the outside and inside to offer the highest strength and chemical resistance.