Hazmat Suits | Dupont | Lakeland | Tyvek | TyChem | Protective Clothing

Enviro Safety is a leader in disposable protective clothing, offering a variety of options that apply to many situations. Protect yourself from harmful materials by using Enviro Safety Products’ extensive line of hazmat suits, from Class A models to disposable coveralls and chemical-resistant varieties. Our safety specialists are on standby to answer any questions you may have about which suit is right for you. We sell the most popular lines, including DuPont and Lakeland. We understand all the risks that come with a hazardous work situation and want you to feel safe and protected. You can click below to learn about the difference in Coveralls as well as click into our top selling brands to purchase MicroMax Coveralls and Tyvek coveralls. We also specialize in Dupont Proshield and several other specialized lines.


Our protective clothing provides the best in quality and care and is the key to keeping yourself protected against hazardous elements. This wide-range of products includes items that are disposable as well as durable. We offer a collection of Class A hazmat suits that comply with federal regulations and guard against disease with top-quality materials. Suit up and seal out chemicals and other harmful substances with our array of disposable protective clothing that meets Class A standards.



 


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Comprehensive Coverage is Easy with HazMat Suits from Enviro

When working in an industry where there is a strong need for hazmat protective clothing, whether it’s Class A coveralls or chemical-resistant disposable gear, safety is the main priority. Our clothing is created to provide protection from hazmat materials and substances. The high quality of our suits and coveralls ensures a high performance level while retaining low, affordable prices. We keep our clothing accessible as we understand the need for safety. For the highest level of shielding, try a Class A hazmat suit. When more moderate coverage is needed, our line of disposable coveralls from ChemMax, Tychem and Tyvek are a great fit. Find the protective clothing that suits your work environment with our selection of chemical-resistant hazmat suits from Enviro Safety Products.



Seam Types

Serged Seams for dry protection

Serged Seam

A serged seam joins two pieces of material with a thread stitch that interlocks. This is an economical stitching method for general applications. Chemical protective clothing generally does not employ this stitching method. It is more commonly found on limited use clothing where dry particulates are of a concern.

 
Bound seams for liquid and dry protection

Sewn and Bound Seam

This seam joins two pieces of material with an overlay of similar material and is chain stitched through all of the layers for a clean, finished edge. This provides increased holdout of liquids and dry particulates.

 
sealed seams for level A and B protection

Heat Sealed Seam

A heat-sealed seam is sewn and then sealed with heat-activated tape. This method provides liquid-proof seams and is especially useful for Level A and B chemical protective clothing.
 
sealed seams for level A and B protection

Heat Sealed Plus Seam

This is the strongest seam offered. This seam is created by sewing and then heat-sealing the outside and inside to offer the highest strength and chemical resistance.
 
NFPA Standards
NFPA1991: Standard on Vapor-Protective Ensembles for Hazardous Materials Emergencies and CBRN Terrorism Incidents (2016 Edition) This is one of the highest safety standards on the books, calling for fully encapsulated chemical protection covering 100% of the wearer’s body. A self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) is absolutely necessary when using protection of this caliber. The chemical barrier must be broad, emcompassing liquids and gases, toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) and chemical warfare agents (CWAs). The protection must be gas-tight and hold up under pressure, with limited flame resistance. The standard is consistent with EPA/OSHA Level A.

NFPA1992: “Standard on Liquid Splash-Protective Ensembles and Clothing for Hazardous Materials Emergencies” (2018 Edition) This is the standard for protective coverall garments that feature penetration barriers against liquids (not vapors). The garment can be one- or multi-piece, as long as it passes the relevant tests. Garments can be certified by themselves or as an ensemble (with specific respirators or other accessories). The standard is consistent with EPA/OSHA Level B.

NFPA1994: “Standard on Protective Ensembles for First Responders to Hazardous Materials Emergencies and CBRN Terrorism Incidents” (2018 Edition) This is standard is divided into four “classes” of protective ensembles: Class 1 ensembles protect emergency first responders in situations that involve vapor or liquid chemical hazards in concentrations that are considered immediately dangerous to life or health (IDLH). Self-contained breathing apparati (SCBA) are required in these environments.
Class 2 ensembles provide limited protection to first responders in situations where vapor or liquid chemical hazards are at or above IDLH levels. These situations require SCBA equipment as well.
Class 3 ensembles provide limited protection to first responders when hazard levels are below IDLH levels, allowing for the use of air-purifying respirators that aren’t necessarily self-contained.
Class 4 ensembles provide limited protection to first responders in situations with particulate hazards at concentrations below IDLH. Biological and radiological particulate should be protected from in this class, and air-purifying respirators are usable as well.

NFPA2112: “Standard on Flame-Resistant Clothing for Protection of Industrial Personnel Against Short-Duration Thermal Exposures from Fire” (2018 Edition) This standard dictates the minimum performance requirements for flame-resistant garments. Garments are subjected to tests that gauge their thermal insulation, heat stability, flame engulfment resistance, and the stability of the components (threads, zippers, etc.). To be compliant, garments must achieve a 50% or less predicted body burn, extinguish flames on their surfaces quickly and resist melting, and be appropriately and clearly labeled.
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